Raspberry PI Qt Information Kiosk

Qt information kiosk using a Raspberry PI and official touch display. This application demonstrates how to write a full screen Qt Creator C++ application for the Raspberry PI. A simple shopping mall touchscreen information kiosk is built in Qt Creator for this example project.

The image below shows the Raspberry PI Qt information kiosk application running on a touch display.

Qt Information Kiosk

Qt Information Kiosk

When one of the information buttons is touched, the corresponding information screen is displayed with a back button for returning to the main screen. An example of one of the information screens is shown below.

Raspberry PI Kiosk Screen

Raspberry PI Kiosk Screen

Although the 7 inch touch display is rather small for a shopping mall kiosk, the application is a starting point for similar projects. It also serves as a nice demonstration that is not too bulky to carry around.

Raspberry PI Qt Application Development

The application was developed on a Raspberry PI 3 using a normal computer LCD screen. Using a big screen makes layout of the application windows in Qt Creator easier. The application was then tested on a Raspberry PI 2 connected to an official Raspberry PI touch display.

All the necessary software development tools are available for installation on Raspbian Linux. A C++ compiler, Qt Creator and Qt libraries must be installed in order to start Qt development.

Creating the Raspberry PI Qt Information Kiosk Application

All the steps needed to create this project are explained on the Raspberry PI Qt Information Kiosk project page on the Starting Electronics website. Here you will be able to download all the source code for the project and see how to create the project from scratch.

Although this project is just a demo of how to write a full screen touch application for the Raspberry PI, it can be used as a starting point for many other applications. Use the source code and project instructions to build your own Qt C++ applications – enjoy!

 

Raspberry PI Touchscreen Kiosk

A Raspberry PI touchscreen kiosk project GUI application using GTK+ 3 and Glade. A full-screen information kiosk application written in C for the Raspberry PI.

Raspberry PI Touchscreen Kiosk

Raspberry PI Touchscreen Kiosk

Raspberry PI Touchscreen Kiosk Details

This Raspberry PI touchscreen kiosk project is a demo application that shows a simple mall with four shops. An official Raspberry PI touchscreen is used as an information kiosk. When any button on the screen is touched, information for the corresponding page is displayed.

An example of one of the information screens for a shop is shown in the image below.

Raspberry Pi Kiosk Info Screen

Raspberry Pi Kiosk Info Screen

GTK+ 3 and Glade 3 Raspberry Pi Project

GTK is a toolkit that is used to create windows and widgets such as buttons, images and text boxes. Glade is a user interface design application that allows windows to be designed and laid out graphically. It is used to design the GUI of the application.

The Application is written in the C programming language. GTK functions are called in the C code to draw the windows and widgets designed in Glade and to attach callback functions to window events such as button presses.

Application Details and Code

The project is built from a set of GTK template files that make it easy to start a new GTK / Glade GUI application. Full code and project details can be found in the Raspberry PI Information Kiosk project on the Starting Electronics website.

The code and example project can help you to start your own Raspberry PI GUI application development if you are building an information kiosk or similar application.

Go to the Raspberry PI Kiosk Page →

Raspberry PI Security Camera

How to build a Raspberry PI security camera using a Raspberry PI camera and a USB camera. I built these two cameras using older Raspberry PI B and B+ boards (not the version 2 or 3) using motionEyeOS for the operating system.

The camera live video, recorded video, recorded images and settings are accessed by connecting to the camera with a web browser. Cameras are connected to the network by either wired Ethernet or WiFi from the Raspberry PI boards. The camera can be set to start recording as soon as motion is detected.

RPI Camera Raspberry PI Security Camera and WiFi

The first camera uses a Raspberry PI camera and Raspberry PI model B+ board. Connection to the network is via WiFi. The image below shows the Raspberry PI board set up with the RPI camera, USB WiFi dongle and micro SD card.

Raspberry PI Security Camera with WiFi Connection

Raspberry PI Security Camera with WiFi Connection

USB Camera and Wired Ethernet

The second camera uses a Raspberry PI model B board, full sized SD card and an external USB camera as shown in the following image.

Raspberry PI Board with USB Camera and Wired Ethernet

Raspberry PI Board with USB Camera and Wired Ethernet

A cheap USB camera is attached to the board via the black USB connector in the above image.

Cheap USB Camera

Cheap USB Camera

Installing and Setting up the motionEyeOS Software

Details on setting up the Raspberry PI camera and motionEyeOS software can be found on the Starting Electronics website. The article shows how to set up the Raspberry PI camera and wired Ethernet connection.

Security Camera Video Image in Web Browser

Security Camera Video Image in Web Browser

The motionEyeOS software is a complete operating system and camera motion detection software all in one. A SD card image is simply installed onto the SD card to install all the software. The Raspberry PI board and camera can then be accessed from a web browser.

Even if WiFi is to be used, the board must first be connected to a network using wired Ethernet so that the board can be accessed from a web browser and settings changed to use WiFi.

Further details and settings can be found on the motionEyeOS wiki pages.

Raspberry PI Security Camera Performance and Issues

Recording Reliability

I have found that the camera, whether USB or RPI, does not reliably trigger and start recording every time that motion occurs in front of the camera. This problem occurs even with a fairly modest frame rate and fast SD card. I suspect that it is due to the performance of the Raspberry PI board. Performance should improve with a model 2 or 3 board.

Triggering on Unwanted Motion

If there is a tree or anything that moves when there is wind, this is a problem. Because of this, the camera will detect unwanted motion and start recording. On a windy day this is a big problem as the SD card will start to fill with unwanted recordings.

Arduino Projects for Beginners

A list of easy to build Arduino projects for beginners and kids. These projects use easy to obtain components and can be built on an electronics breadboard. Suitable for use with an Arduino Uno or similar board.

Arduino projects for absolute beginners below list very easy projects for first time Arduino users. The section that follows lists projects for beginners who have learned the basics of how to use an Arduino.

Arduino Projects for Absolute Beginners

The simple projects below are suitable for absolute beginners with Arduino. They are part of a series of tutorials that introduce beginners to basic electronics. For beginners who have not yet used an electronics breadboard, see how to build a simple circuit on breadboard.

Arduino Projects for Beginners

The Arduino projects for beginners area on the Starting Electronics website has various projects for beginners such as:

Other projects suitable for beginners:

Programming Arduino

Beginners wanting to learn how to program Arduino can look at the Arduino programming course.

Arduino Ethernet Shield

For those wanting to know how to use the Arduino Ethernet shield as  a web server, the Arduino Ethernet shield web server tutorial explains all you need to know.

Other Arduino Resources

Also see the following areas on the Starting Electronics website:

  • Arduino Projects – various Arduino projects for beginners and more advanced users.
  • Arduino Tutorials –  interesting Arduino tutorials.
  • Arduino Articles – various articles and small projects such as how to battery power an Arduino, connecting a buzzer to Arduino, using Arduino to measure voltage and more.
  • Arduino Software – various Arduino software projects and information on installing Arduino software.

Another useful resource for projects is the Arduino tutorials page on the Arduino website.

Moving Light Display Arduino Project for Beginners

This easy Arduino project for beginners can be built on an electronic breadboard and uses only four LEDs and four series resistors to make a moving light display. The Arduino sketch for the project can be modified to change the rate at which the pattern on the LEDs is updated. The patterns to display on the LEDs can also be changed.

Moving Light Display Arduino Project for Beginners

Moving Light Display Arduino Project for Beginners

Details of this Arduino Project for Beginners

A breadboard is used to connect four LEDs with series resistors to an Arduino which can be an Arduino Uno or other Arduino. Four wire links connect the LEDs to four of the Arduino pins which are set as outputs. A common GND wire from the Arduino is connected to the breadboard which connects the other side of each of the series resistors to GND. This completes the circuit and enables the LEDs to be switched on by the sketch running on the Arduino.

Moving LED Arduino Project

Moving LED Arduino Project

The full project includes the circuit diagram, Arduino sketch code and instructions on how to modify the sketch to display different moving light LED patterns on the LEDs.

Other Arduino Beginner Project Resources

Those new to Arduino may be interested in the beginners electronics series of tutorials that includes an introduction to Arduino.

The same tutorial series includes ten Arduino projects for absolute beginners which is a sample of various Arduino built-in examples with instructions on how to build each project.